Gardening

Keeping deer out of the garden bonnie plants

Keeping deer out of the garden bonnie plants



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Keeping deer out of the garden bonnie plants the natural way

Most gardeners want to grow vegetables and flowers and eat well in their own backyard. But if there’s room in your garden, keep an eye out for wildlife. Deer are nocturnal, but they can easily take to the garden at dusk, especially if there are plenty of acorns and other high-tannin plants for them to eat. Other wildlife that like your garden for feeding are ground-feeding songbirds, and they like to eat both the new growth of grasses and tender leaves.

In addition to their food, they like to browse and drink. Deer eat most kinds of food plants that you don’t. They’ll eat plants in the rose family, as well as many kinds of vegetables, herbs and flowers. In addition to browsing, they may eat bulbs and tender vegetables, and they’ll eat some of the new shoots on perennial flowering shrubs. Gardeners can help manage deer pressure by planting plants with lower tannin and higher palatability, but it’s important not to get too hung up on how deer will behave. This is part of the reason gardeners grow vegetables and herbs so well! Even under heavy deer pressure, good garden crops can be a good thing.

We’ve made a list of deer-tolerant plants so you can help manage wildlife damage to your home garden.

1. Corncrake(Zea mays var. porridge)

You can’t buy corncrakes, and corncrakes love to hide under corn stalks, but they can easily be grown. Plant the corn in the fall, after the harvest, and you can plant in an isolated area of your garden where deer won’t be browsing or walking through. The corn is good for winter forage and will help manage deer pressure.

Photo: Corncrake.

2. Perennial Flowers

If you prefer spring blooms, choose plants with lower tannin and higher palatability. Plants with larger blossoms tend to be preferred, as are those with deeper colors and lower tannin. Tender perennials can also help to protect perennials from browsing deer. The plants have no leaves at this point, so they don’t get mowed down.

3. Shrubs and Vines

Shrubs and vines with woody stems, such as Japanese privets, red cedar, and mountain laurel, may provide shelter to other plants. In some areas, deciduous shrubs and vines may need to be planted in the fall. When deer are mowed down, some flowers will be available for the next season. Shrubs can be tied together and grow tall, which protects perennials from deer browsing. In addition to deer protection, most deciduous plants have beautiful spring blooms.

4. Deer Trellises

Deer can easily jump off of deer-proof fences or trellises that provide a stable platform. Trellises can be made out of wood, metal, or other suitable materials. Make sure the structure is securely attached to the ground and don’t overlook securing it to trees in areas where deer are more likely to browse.

5. Deer Proofing with a Scarecrow

Deer can easily jump off of deer-proof fences or trellises that provide a stable platform. Trellises can be made out of wood, metal, or other suitable materials. Make sure the structure is securely attached to the ground and don’t overlook securing it to trees in areas where deer are more likely to browse.

Photo: Deer proof fencing.

6. Natural Controls

Plants with spines, thorns, or other plant defenses can help to deter deer. There are also natural predators that may help out by preying on deer. Deer are sometimes more of a nuisance than a problem so other species can be used to control their population.

7. Deer-Proof Attachments

Deer-proof attachments are small devices designed to slow deer movement on deer-proof fences or trellises. Deer-proof fences or trellises that have deer-proof attachments are the safest type of deer-proof fencing.

8. A Wildlife Perimeter

A wildlife perimeter is a series of fences or other obstacles that are designed to limit deer movement between different areas. When properly constructed and maintained, this type of wildlife perimeter will help to prevent deer from browsing in undesirable areas.

9. Artificial Water Sources

Drought and lack of water will make deer move in search of drinking water. When an area’s deer population becomes so large it begins to browse in undesirable areas, fencing should be erected around the area so that the deer can’t get there.

10. A Fenced-In Garden

When deer become abundant in an area, it’s common for them to browse in gardens and eat plants that are not well-suited for deer browsing. Fencing in a garden is a good way to make sure that deer don’t eat unwanted plants.

11. Deer-Proof Plants

Plants that have spines, thorns, or other plant defenses can deter deer. These deer-proof plants can also be used to control deer in gardens.

If you are having trouble controlling deer in your yard, consider the above ideas and see how they may be able to help you. We hope that this article will provide some helpful information that will help you to control deer in your garden.

If you would like to know more about controlling deer, deer-proof fences, and everything else related to protecting your garden, visit this page.